Common Core Standards—English, Literacy and Writing

Common Core Standards—English, Literacy and Writing

Common Core Standards—Rutgers Prep comparisons

English Language Arts/Literacy examples

9th & 10th Grade—Reading Literature Standard 1:  “Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.”

RPS meets the standard by concentrating on analysis of every text studied.    RPS exceeds the standard by using college level texts, and expecting students to understand and apply literary terms such as conflict, perspective/point of view; dynamic vs static characters, etc., in their analyses.  For example, in the story “A Rose for Emily,” much of the action must be inferred because the first person narrator does not have access to Emily Grierson’s mind.

11th & 12th Grade—Reading Literature Standard 3:  “Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).”

RPS meets the standard by requiring students to address plot, characterization, and setting in every story that we read.  RPS exceeds the standard by rewriting “The Metamorphosis” as a first person narrative from the Grete’s point of view, whereby students gain an entirely different perspective of Gregor Samsa.  This enables us to discuss why Kafka may have decided to tell a story in the manner in which he did.

 

Literacy in History/Social Studies examples

9th-10th Grade—Craft and Structure Standard 6:  “Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.”

RPS meets the standard by comparing and contrasting two primary sources from Ancient Rome describing the arrival of barbarians (one sees positives, the other negatives).  RPS exceeds the standard by contrasting two very different views of Byzantine Emperor Justinian written by the same author many years apart (9th grade CIV class).

11th-12th Grade— Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Standard 10:  “By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.”

RPS exceeds the standard by employing college-level texts in US History (American Pageant), American Government (Lowi, Ginsburg, Schepsle), as well as AP level texts in AP courses.

 

Literacy in Science/Technical Subjects examples

9th-10th Grade—Key Ideas and Details Standard 2:  “Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; trace the text’s explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon, or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text.”

RPS meets the standard in 9th grade Introduction to Chemistry and Physics, where students summarize a selection of science journal articles on topics of their choosing.  RPS exceeds the standard by allowing students to research and select their own appropriate articles and requiring them to cite sources according to academic standards.

9th-10th Grade—Key Ideas and Details Standard 3:  “Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks, attending to special cases or exceptions defined in the text.”

RPS meets the standard in 10th grade Biology, where students extract DNA from multiple species and amplify one of their own genes using polymerase chain reaction.  RPS exceeds the standard when students analyze their class data from the DNA lab to determine whether their class is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, which achieves an 11-12th grade C.C.S. standard.

11th-12th Grade—Craft and Structure Standard 4:  “Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.”

RPS meets the standard when Chemistry students create three-dimensional representations of the elemental properties in the periodic table.  This requires them to understand how elemental properties are represented in the periodic table.

11th-12th Grade—Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Standard 7:  “Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.”

RPS exceeds the standard in that the above-mentioned periodic table project requires students to express (instead of merely integrating and evaluating) elemental properties three-dimensionally, demonstrating both the properties of individual elements as well as trends across the periodic table.

11th-12th Grade—Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Standard 9: “Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.”

RPS meets the standard in AP Environmental Science, where students learn about global climate change from text, video and several internet computer simulations helping them visualize the greenhouse effect, Coriolis effect, etc…  RPS exceeds the standard when students choose one person involved in the issue and, after researching their views, representing that person in a classroom debate.

11th-12th Grade—Key Ideas and Details Standards 1 & 3:  “Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions the author makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.  Follow precisely a complex multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks; analyze the specific results based on explanations in the text.”

RPS meets the standard in Forensic Science, where student teams create crime scenes with a background stories and multiple types of evidence and then solve another team’s crime scene by collecting data, carrying out lab analyses and writing a police report.  RPS exceeds the standard by requiring students to not only follow complex procedures and identify gaps and inconsistencies but they must also deliberately create these gaps and inconsistencies in their crime scene.

 

Writing examples

9th-10th Grade—Production and Distribution of Writing Standard 6:  “Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.”

RPS meets the standard in that World Language classes use available technology to write movie scripts.  RPS exceeds the standard when written scripts are transformed into final drafts employing the use of the Internet, Final Cut Studio and various audio software.  The final product is then published for public viewing, including competition entrance.

9th-10th Grade—Text Types & Purposes Standard 2: “Write informative/ explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.”
RPS meets the standard when music students in choirs, band and orchestra assess on their performance after the annual concerts, as well as evaluating the performances of other ensembles.   They provide their point of view based on musical criteria and specific vocabulary that is articulated through the practice and application of music skills.  RPS exceeds the standard in that prior to written assessments, students have conversations in class after dress rehearsals and prior to each concert that establishes appropriate criteria, definition and objectives for their written evaluation.

9th-10th Grade—Research to Build and Present Knowledge Standard 7:  “Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.”

RPS meets the standard when Photography I students are assigned a traditional research paper.  RPS exceeds the standard in that the research paper is individualized. Each student’s personality and artistic proclivities are assessed throughout the first semester, in order to assign an individually selected photographer to research.

 

Upper School Curriculum